Menus for New Year’s Celebrations

NEW YEAR’S EVE BUFFET:
With a low-carb feast like this one, your actions will match your words when you raise a glass and toast “to your health!”

Hot Brie with Almonds and Candied Kumquats
Macadamia and Coconut Crusted Shrimp with Sweet and Spicy Sauce
Platter of Cold Sliced Roast Beef, Turkey, and Ham with
Mustard, Horseradish, and Cranberry Sauce
Sliced Tomatoes, Dill Pickles, and Assorted Olives
Pumpkin Tamales
Waldorf Salad
Basket of Mixed Flour Bread, Tortillas, and Parmesan Sesame Crackers

Raspberry Trifle
Champagne and an assortment of beverages on ice

NEW YEAR’S DAY DINNER:

Traditional foods for New Year’s Day are not the festive, rich feasts of the recent holidays, but simple, rustic, everyday foods. The belief that eating such foods would insure a plentiful supply of the same for the coming year has its roots in many folk customs. In Arkansas, where I grew up, eating pork and black-eyed peas guaranteed good fortune. My husband, from West Virginia, says his uncle Ben always had a bite of pork and sauerkraut on his fork ready to eat at the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve.

Pigs symbolize luck, fertility, and abundance in many different cultures. Beans of various kinds represent coins; cabbage and leafy greens signify paper money, while yellow-colored cornbread means you will receive gold.

Ham and Tepary Bean Soup
Choucroute Garni
Fried Cornbread
Apple Galette with Heavy Cream

Recipes in bold are from Carb Wars; Sugar is the New Fat

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