LOW-CARB, GLUTEN-FREE, FLAX-FREE, FLEXIBLE WRAPS

I’ve been experimenting with flexible wraps since I posted an article about the potential dangers of flax, a common ingredient in many gluten-free wraps, breads, and tortillas. The original post is here. I wanted a replacement that would taste great, be easy to make, low in carbs, and flexible enough to use for tacos and sandwiches, but free of plant estrogens and toxins. It took a lot of tries, but I’m very pleased with this recipe. No kneading or rolling and they have only 1.6 net carbs each! EASY WRAPS Ingredietns: 4eggs 4 tbsp coconut milk or other low-carb…

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THE ESSENCE OF SPRING: RHUBARB SHORTCAKE

My rhubarb plants start testing the air in mid-winter, sending up ruffled probes through the mulch to ask, “Is it time yet?” Those persistent little sprouts are always a cheerful reminder that Spring will eventually come, no matter how remote it seems on a cold, gloomy day. The strawberries are not yet planted, but the rhubarb was ready to harvest before the daffodils budded. I topped my Yogurt Biscuits with roasted rhubarb in a vanilla-scented syrup and whipped cream to make shortcakes, the perfect dessert to welcome the season! RHUBARB SHORTCAKES Ingredients: 1 and 1/2 lb  rhubarb, trimmed and sliced 1-inch thick (about…

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GLUTEN-FREE YOGURT BISCUITS

I am so excited about my new recipe! It came out perfect the first time I tried it. The recipe is super easy and quick to make and the biscuits taste astonishingly like the buttermilk biscuits my mother used to make, but these are gluten-free, wheat-free, and low-carb. I used Jennifer Eloff’s Gluten-free Bake Mix™ as a starting point. Isn’t teamwork great? GLUTEN-FREE, LOW-CARB YOGURT BISCUITSIngredients:1½ cups Jennifer’s Gluten-Free Bake Mix™, or other low-carb, gluten-free bake mix (see below for bake mix recipe), plus a little extra for shaping the biscuits 2 tsp baking…

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WHEAT BELLY COOKBOOK REVIEW: IS FLAX THE NEW WHEAT?

Dr. Davis has succeeded in drawing attention to the dangers of wheat and the benefits of a low-carb diet beyond what I thought possible. He builds a convincing case against this new plant that he says shouldn’t even be called “wheat,” and he documents most of his arguments with supportive research. I was already avoiding most grains and decided to eliminate wheat after reading Wheat Belly. I have been following a low-carb lifestyle and writing about it for over 13 years, so it wasn’t a radical change…

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VALIDATION: Peter Reinhart

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   Gluten-free products, recipes, and cookbooks are everywhere these days, but most of them just sub high-carb starches like potato, corn, tapioca, and rice for wheat, rye, and barley. The cookbook above is different. You can’t read the subtitle very well here, but it says, “80 Low-carb Recipes that Offer Solutions for Celiac Disease, Diabetes, and Weight Loss.” It was written by Peter Reinhart and Denene Wallace. Peter Reinhart is a world-class expert on bread and baking. Mario Batali called him the Leonardo da Vinci of bread. He has written nine books, including The Bread Baker’s Apprentice,…

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FLAX: THE ULTIMATE SUPERFOOD?

Breakfast Bites from Louise’s Foods Little bags of tasty, grain-free cereal and granola from a company called FlaxGold were included in the swag bags everyone received at check-in on the last Low-Carb Cruise. The main ingredient was, as you may have guessed, flax. Flax has become popular in diet foods where it is used to lower the calories and increase the fiber. It is also used as a zero-carb thickener and flour substitute in low-carb recipes and flax oil is sold as an omega-3 supplement. Many low-carbers are eating flax in…

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IS THERE A “GOOD” GRAIN?

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Since the advent of agriculture, man has been “improving” grain crops to make them starchier, sweeter, less perishable, and easier to grow and to harvest. Now that we are seeing the consequences, scientists are starting to reverse-engineer some food crops to more closely resemble their ancient ancestors. Sustagrain barley is one of the first to become available to the consumer. For comparison, General Mills has been advertising that Cheerios® have been “proven to reduce cholesterol,” based on the amount of soluble fiber they contain. The…

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