HOMINY ALERT

I’ve posted about how it is hard it is to determine the real nutritional data for foods before. (Here is a past article about dueling labels on dairy products: http://carbwars.blogspot.com/2009/09/when-does-16-x-049-zero.html.) I do my best to check things out to be sure my information is correct, and I contact the companies if there is any question, just to be sure. When I first noticed that the net carb count on Mexican Style hominy was significantly lower than that for regular hominy (4 net in a 1/2 cup serving versus about…

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WHEAT BELLY COOKBOOK REVIEW: IS FLAX THE NEW WHEAT?

Dr. Davis has succeeded in drawing attention to the dangers of wheat and the benefits of a low-carb diet beyond what I thought possible. He builds a convincing case against this new plant that he says shouldn’t even be called “wheat,” and he documents most of his arguments with supportive research. I was already avoiding most grains and decided to eliminate wheat after reading Wheat Belly. I have been following a low-carb lifestyle and writing about it for over 13 years, so it wasn’t a radical change…

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A TRAGIC EPIDEMIC AND CANDY FOR CHRISTMAS

Another day, another mass murder, this latest one in Longmont, Colorado. There were only four killed, and they were adults, so it didn’t get the media coverage devoted to the horrific massacre at Sandy Hook in Connecticut, but it is now more apparent than ever that we are dealing with another epidemic. Everyone is asking “why did this happen?,” and, “what can we do?” Investigators are looking into the lives of the shooters to try to find the commonality between them. Gun control is being…

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VALIDATION: Peter Reinhart

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   Gluten-free products, recipes, and cookbooks are everywhere these days, but most of them just sub high-carb starches like potato, corn, tapioca, and rice for wheat, rye, and barley. The cookbook above is different. You can’t read the subtitle very well here, but it says, “80 Low-carb Recipes that Offer Solutions for Celiac Disease, Diabetes, and Weight Loss.” It was written by Peter Reinhart and Denene Wallace. Peter Reinhart is a world-class expert on bread and baking. Mario Batali called him the Leonardo da Vinci of bread. He has written nine books, including The Bread Baker’s Apprentice,…

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AN UNCONVENTIONAL “RICE” PUDDING

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I have nothing green to post for St. Patrick’s Day, but that’s OK because I’m neither Catholic nor Irish. (Orange is the color for Irish Protestants.) I do have a tasty new recipe to share, however, and you can tint it green if you want to. I haven’t had time to run the nutrition counts on it, but a quick guess-timate is about 2 net carbs for each of 6 servings. The Mexican hominy has a net of 4 grams per 1/2 cup, if anyone wants to run the numbers for me.…

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SERIOUSLY FUNNY CEREAL

Food blogger, Kiri Tannenbaum, (www.delish.com) posted this story about an art installation at a Ralph’s supermarket in Venice, CA. Artist Ron English’s entertaining statement about a serious subject is titled, “Popaganda.” Artist’s Cereal-Box Stunt Makes a Real Point About Sugary CereaOctober 13, 2011 at 8:58AM by Kiri Tannenbaum On the heels of a restaurant serving diners on Sadaam Hussein’s plates comes another clever stunt. This time it’s on cereal boxes. If you live in the Los Angeles area and happen to be perusing the cereal aisle at the…

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HOMINY SALAD

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Here’s a potato-less side dish, just in time for your Fourth of July cookout. The recipe is adapted from one by Martha Hall Foose; hers is made with regular hominy and has 20 net grams of carbohydrate per cup; mine has 6.l grams. Have a great day!  Hominy Salad Ingredients: 1 can (29-ounces) Juanita’s or Teasdale’s Mexican-style hominy 2 cups chopped fresh tomatoes 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese ¼ cup mayonnaise ¼ cup Greek-style, full-fat yogurt ½ cup chopped red bell pepper 4 green onions, chopped…

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“Risotto”

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Valentine’s Day is the perfect time to splurge on duck breasts—you only need two servings. I haven’t decided if I will use the Duck Breasts with Raspberry Glaze recipe that I created for the new book or the Pan-seared Duck Breasts with one of the sweet chutneys from Carb Wars. Either way, I will be making my faux Risotto as the side dish. It is super easy, it tastes as good as the labor-intensive ones served in fancy restaurants, and we can enjoy it guilt-free,…

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IS THERE A “GOOD” GRAIN?

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Since the advent of agriculture, man has been “improving” grain crops to make them starchier, sweeter, less perishable, and easier to grow and to harvest. Now that we are seeing the consequences, scientists are starting to reverse-engineer some food crops to more closely resemble their ancient ancestors. Sustagrain barley is one of the first to become available to the consumer. For comparison, General Mills has been advertising that Cheerios® have been “proven to reduce cholesterol,” based on the amount of soluble fiber they contain. The…

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GNUDI: PASTA THAT MAKES ITSELF

Gnudi © 2008   Gnudi with Browned Butter Sauce © 2008 I spent a lot of time on this recipe a while back but never published it on my blog. It was luscious, gorgeous, and very easy, so why didn’t it make the cut? Because I couldn’t figure out a way to do an accurate nutrition count. I decided to post it anyway and see if anyone out there could come up with a solution (other than actually paying to have the final dish analyzed,…

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TOO DELICIOUS FOR WORDS: BAKED MACARONI AND CHEESE CUSTARD

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The word “custard” doesn’t prepare you for the beautiful, brown, cheesy crust. I could have called this Macaroni and Cheese Soufflé (it tastes like one, but that makes it sound much harder to make than it is), or Crustless Macaroni and Cheese Quiche (no improvement over the first title), or Cheese Puff (sounds too much like Cheetos®). Whatever you call it, I know you are going to love this versatile macaroni and cheese dish: it can be served for breakfast; as the main course for…

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