RASPBERRY FROZEN YOGURT

A delicious frozen treat that can be ready in an flash! Sugar-free and low-carb.

Raspberry Frozen Yogurt

Three years ago we planted three dwarf, thornless raspberry bushes. They were a new variety called Raspberry Shortcake™. We had a lot of rain this spring and the bushes exploded with big, sweet berries. We have eaten a lot more than we should have, given them away, frozen them, and made pies, but they keep coming. The good news is, we will have enough for many future batches of my new raspberry frozen yogurt.

Now the downside: our bounty may have contributed to an ecological disaster. The bushes are sprouting up everywhere: in the flower beds, in the grass, and this morning I found one coming up through a crack in the front walk. Once they make it to the woods, there will be no stopping them. I would feel more guilty about unleashing them into the wild if Washington state were not already being suffocated by invasive Himalayan blackberries. They may have met their match. If the new raspberries can out-compete them, we will have tasty, free food for the picking and we won’t get cut and bloodied in the process.

RASPBERRY FROZEN YOGURT
A high-speed blender will puree raspberries so finely that the seeds will disappear. You can use a food processor instead if you don’t mind the seeds, but strawberries might be a better choice if you prefer a creamy-smooth treat. If you use the optional glycerine, your frozen yogurt will be easy to scoop straight out of the freezer!

Ingredients:
2 cups frozen red raspberries or chopped strawberries (½ pound)
1 cup Greek-style yogurt or coconut yogurt
3 tablespoons powdered sugar substitute, such as Swerve or LC-Confectionery Powdered Sweetener
4 tablespoons IMO syrup*
High-intensity liquid sweetener, such as stevia, monk fruit, or sucralose to taste, if needed.**
1/8 teaspoon of salt
1/2 teaspoon glycerine, optional
1 tablespoon Chambord or other liqueur, optional***

Directions:
Place frozen berries, yogurt, sugar substitutes, syrup, salt, glycerine, and liqueur (if using), in a high-speed blender or food processor. Process according to directions for your appliance until smooth. (My Vitamix says it is ready when 4 mounds form in the mixture.) Serve immediately as soft serve or scrape into a container and freeze for 20 minutes or so for a firmer product.

Makes 2 ¼ cups.
Nutrition data for each of 4 servings.
Calories: 64; Protein: 6.1 g; Total carbs: 8.3 g; Fiber: 4 g: Net carbs: 4.3 g
Sweeteners are not included in count as choices may vary.
Carbs in yogurt are estimated to be 4 grams per cup since much of the sugar will have been eaten by the live cultures. (That’s why it tastes sour, not sweet.)

Notes:
*Add a little high-intensity sweetener, such as stevia or monk fruit, if needed, depending on the sweetness of the berries and personal taste. Remember that foods often taste less sweet after freezing.

**Isomalto-oligosaccharide syrup is a low-calorie, low-glycemic, and low-carb sweetener that provides prebiotic dietary fiber for digestive health. It is made from starch, which can be either non-GMO corn or tapioca. IMO is similar to polydextrose but claims to be “all natural.” It is the main ingredient in Quest® bars. Those of you who monitor your blood sugar should check to see how IMO affects you.

Two brands of IMO syrup and sources:
1. FiberYum™ IMO is made of Paleo-friendly tapioca. It lists 5 grams of carbs and 5 of fiber for a net of 0 in 1 teaspoon. www.fiberyum.com
2. VitaFiber™ IMO lists 5 grams of carbs and 4.5 grams of fiber for a net of 0.5 grams per teaspoon. https://www.vitafiber.ca/pages/vitafiber-nutritional-information

***The optional liqueur adds a burst of intense flavor and the small amount of alcohol helps lower the freezing point to keep the frozen yogurt softer. It will add 1.2 grams of sugar per serving.

Photo: © 2016, Judy Barnes Baker
© 2016, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwarscookbooks.com

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Judy Barnes Baker

After seven years of re-creating all our favorite recipes, I wanted to share what I have learned so other people wouldn’t have to start from scratch. My working title was You’ll Never Know What You Are Missing, which sums up what I was trying to do: to make eating for health synonymous with eating for pleasure. I published my second book, Nourished, in 2012. So am I still an artist? Absolutely. And I consider Carb Wars and Nourished to be the most creative things I have ever done. I am currently a member of Northwest Designer Craftsmen and the International Association of Culinary Professionals.

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