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I had a request for a recipe for chocolate chips and I realized that I didn’t have one on the blog. This one is adapted from Nourished; a Cookbook for Health, Weight Loss, and Metabolic Balance. You can pour it out in a sheet and chop it up to make chips or you can make candy cups, bars, or fruit and nut clusters.

Adding liquid to melted chocolate is a big no-no. After years of making my chocolate chips with powdered, dry sweetener, I hit on a better solution. It lets me use one of the zero-carb liquids as the primary sweetener without causing the chocolate to seize and turn into a hard, dry lump.

1 teaspoon no-trans-fat shortening, such as Spectrum*
High-intensity liquid sweetener equal to ½ cup sugar**
A few grains of fine salt
4 ounces unsweetened chocolate, chopped

Line a baking sheet with parchment, waxed paper, or foil
and place in the refrigerator to chill.

Place liquid sweetener and salt in a small saucepan. Add shortening and place over very low heat until shortening melts. Cook and stir for 1 minute more to let the liquid evaporate. Stir in chocolate and continue to stir until almost smooth. Remove from heat and let cool, stirring frequently, until it is about 80° F. (The slow cooling tempers the chocolate so it is smooth and shiny.) Pour it out on the chilled sheet pan and tilt the pan to spread the chocolate to a thickness of about ⅜ inch. Return pan to refrigerator until chocolate is cold. Peel off the paper or foil and chop into chips. Store away from heat in a covered container.

Makes 1 cup or 8 servings of 2 tablespoons each.
Per serving—Net carbohydrate:
1.9 grams; Protein:1.9 grams; Fiber: 2.4 grams; Fat: 8.1 grams; 77 Calories:
Total weight: 4 ounces
Weight per serving: ½ ounce
Preparation time: 10 minutes

Pour melted chocolate into molds to make sugar-free chocolate candy cups or bars.

Mix in chopped nuts, coconut, or chopped, dried cranberries and drop by teaspoonfuls to make nut and/or fruit clusters.

*You can use coconut oil if you prefer, but the chocolate will be softer and melt more easily. Coconut oil melts at 76 degrees.

**Any liquid sweetener will work for this recipe. You can use liquid stevia if you like the taste, monk fruit, sucralose, or a combination, however, the combination of sucralose and chocolate can be bitter. Adding a small amount of another sweetener gives a more natural sweet taste. (Commercial products often combine sucralose with Acesulfame K.)

Salty is the opposite of bitter. If your coffee is bitter, add a little salt. It also takes away some of the bitterness in chocolate. Use only fine salt so chocolate won’t be grainy.

(c) 2015, Judy Barnes Baker,

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  1. Can coconut oil be used instead of the shortening?

  2. Anonymous: yes you can use coconut oil. but the chips and candy will be softer and melt easier. You can keep it in the refrigerator if necessary.

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